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Fall of Gratitude

Fall of Gratitude

Fall of Gratitude: Larkspur Conservation launched a capital giving campaign in 2016 to raise the funds needed to purchase the land for a conservation cemetery in Sumner County.  The campaign was successful, the land has been acquired, and infrastructure work is underway, preparing the way for natural burials to begin. At the beginning of that capital campaign we established three giving societies as a way to recognize donors who contributed gifts that equaled the amount required to buy one acre, or more.  (The purchase price for the property was $1,800 per acre.)  These named societies are The Larkspur Society (for gifts equal to five acres or more), The Blue-Eyed Mary Society (three acres), and The Blackberry Society (one acre). We are now publicly acknowledging these donors for the first time.  To each ofthese contributors, we say THANK YOU, THANK YOU.  Without your support, the dream would not have come true.  We hope to more »

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This Is How I Want To Be Dead

This Is How I Want To Be Dead

This Is How I Want To Be Dead, Richard Conniff; The New York Times Years ago, doing some research in England on moles — the burrowing kind — I paid a visit to the grave of Kenneth Grahame. As author of “The Wind in the Willows,” Grahame was the creator of the fictional Mole, a mild-mannered character beloved by children everywhere for messing about in boats, bumbling dimly into the Wild Wood and otherwise misadventuring with Ratty, Badger and Mr. Toad of Toad Hall. There were plenty of things poignant about the grave. But what struck me most was that all of Grahame’s characters would have been at home there. Holywell Cemetery, off a busy road in the heart of Oxford, is both a graveyard and a wildlife refuge. Footpaths wind through shrubby undergrowth, and the graves support a natural succession of snowdrops, daffodils and so on through the seasons. more »

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LAND PURCHASE COMPLETE!

LAND PURCHASE COMPLETE!

For Immediate Release:  Larkspur finalized the purchase of land in Sumner County, paving the way for it’s first burials that can be expected as early as spring of 2018. On Monday April 17th, the Sumner County Commission voted in favor of Larkspur Conservation at Taylor Hollow, Tennessee’s first conservation burial ground. The preserve will be located adjacent to Taylor Hollow State Natural Area (owned by The Nature Conservancy.) There are 100+ natural burial grounds in the U.S., over 200 in the U.K. and even more around the world. Larkspur Conservation’s commitment to conserve land through a revival of traditional burial practices will create a mindful option in Tennessee. Conservation burial occurs when natural burial, combined with a conservation easement, protects land forever.  This particular burial method will prohibit the use of concrete, plastic, metal, exotic woods and formaldehyde from being placed into the soil.  The ecosystem where burial takes place will be protected and more »

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Larkspur in The Tennes-Sierran

Larkspur in The Tennes-Sierran

Tennessee’s Conservation Option for Natural Burials Written by John Stone for the Tennes-Sierran  Larkspur Conservation, Inc. is a Tennessee nonprofit corporation with a mission of conserving land throughout Middle Tennessee through a revival of traditional burial practices. Larkspur anticipates establishing its first conservation burial ground on 155 acres of land located along the Highland Rim in Sumner County, Tennessee, adjacent to The Nature Conservancy’s Taylor Hollow State Natural Area. This property is one of a kind, with a mixed mesophytic forest which is home to numerous plant species, some endangered. The living memorial Larkspur Conservation is creating on this land will preserve this unique ecosystem and honor life. In addition to the preservation and restoration of the habitats acquired by conservation burial sites they also reduce burial activities that damage our natural home. Natural burial, which has been practiced throughout human history, is the practice of burying deceased remains directly more »

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Larkspur in the News! The Tennessean & USA TODAY

Larkspur in the News! The Tennessean & USA TODAY Read the story on The Tennessean How natural burial can conserve land in Middle Tennessee Written by Holly Meyer for The Tennessean Leaves crunched under John Christian Phifer’s boots one evening in early October as he hiked on 155 acres of largely untouched land, pointing out natural markers and speaking in earnest about what its future could hold. It’s where Phifer plans to be buried, cradled by Mother Nature alongside the dogwood trees, ironweed and larkspurs. “I want my body to be able to go toward creating something special that will live on long past me,” he said. “I want to use my body as a tool to save land.” If all falls into place, the Sumner County property bordering Taylor Hollow State Natural Area will become Tennessee’s first conservation cemetery, and the final resting place for anyone who wants a natural burial void more »

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Bury Me Beneath The Willow

Bury Me Beneath The Willow
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